Month: April 2012

Enjoying Spring with your Child

By Lisa Niver Rajna
Lisa Niver RajnaParents love to play with their children but often ask me how to bring more science into everyday fun activities. Most adults think of science as an experiment or equation that has nothing to do with everyday life. But science is the process for figuring out how things work. When you think of it that way, even a construction site can turn into a physics lesson. Take a walk with your child and ask your child to put on his imaginary detective hat and tell you everything he sees to improve powers of observation. You can work in a lesson about photosynthesis when you and your child have a conversation about leaves: Why are they green in the spring, and why do they change color in the fall and drop off the trees? See how many different insects you see or different bird songs you hear. City kids can also soak up a little physics by noticing the timing of the traffic lights—do they depend on the flow of traffic to change or are they pre-set? These are all methods to sneak more science into your day! Your phone is always with you, so turn its camera into a teaching tool and your child can pick up some very cool scientific principles of light. (more…)

Organic Eco-Lunches

By Anni Daulter
Anni DaulterThe mornings in my house are hectic to say the least. I have 4 kids and 3 of which need lunches made, which means I have to be organized, prepared and quick. It also doesn’t help that all of my children like different types of foods in their lunches, but preparing good healthy tasty meals for my kids while they are away at school is very important to me. I know my children, and yours too, expend a lot of energy throughout the day and therefore need to have lunches that are filled with rejuvenating foods that give them the energy they need to play and learn throughout the day.

Take time to prep anything you can the night before. I like to chop vegetables for a stir fry or whip up a pasta sauce for instance the night before, so I can just quickly make it in the morning. It is also important to make sure to have all of your containers ready to go and your child’s lunch basket, bag or box all set to make sure the morning routine goes smoothly. There are some great companies that make eco-friendly containers and reusable carriers that I love and recommend. (more…)

Helpful Test Taking Tips

By Nathalie Kunin
Nathalie KuninGet those No. 2 pencils ready! Test taking season is coming. Each Spring, starting in about the 2nd grade, students throughout America will take a standardized test. These tests have different names depending on the state and school district, but they all test the same skills. Although these standardized tests are important, please remember that they are only one of the tools used to assess how your child is performing academically.

Taking standardized tests annually from a young age helps prepare students for when it is time to take admissions exams like the ISEE, SAT and ACT. The testing doesn’t ever stop – think about the LSAT, GMAT, MCAT and then Boards and State Bars…and then professional continuing education testing. (more…)

Does Your Child Have RSV?

By Peter S. Waldstein, M.D., F.A.A.P and Julia A. White, M.D., F.A.A.P
WaldsteinIn our practice the last 6 to 8 weeks, we have seen a large increase in both cases and questions about RSV. Infections caused by RSV spike every year during the winter and early spring months. Due to the recent increase in RSV activity, we thought discussion of the symptoms and treatment would be useful.

What is RSV, and what are the signs and symptoms of infection?
RSV (respiratory syncytial virus) is a viral infection that is seen very commonly in young children. It is passed via contact with respiratory secretions or droplets of an infected person.

For most children, the infection will likely look similar to any other viral cold – runny nose, cough, congestion, and possible fever. The cough will typically worsen over the first several days often sounding very mucousy, sometimes slightly barking. Once it starts to improve, you may see a cough that lingers for around a week to 10 days. (more…)